Akan Collection

Our handmade Ghanaian fabrics are block printed in collaboration with Reiss Boafo and the artisans of General Artz in Somanya, Ghana.  A block of wood about the size of a human hand is shaved smooth by a machine so it has a perfectly flat surface. (Some blocks are left square on top and some have handles carved into them.) Then the intricately designed Ghanian motifs are carved into the block using chisels, knives, and files.

Both batik and tie-dye were introduced to Ghana from South East Asia in the 1960s. They grew popular from the middle 1960s to the late 1970s. The patronage of this fabric declined significantly in the 1980s due to various reasons some of which include a preference for a cheaper alternative import. It has however seen a revival in recent years.

Early African tie-dye involved a lot of spots and specks on the designs. They tied as well as stitched the fabrics to achieve a look different from the rest of the world. Other techniques such as painting and splashing the wax onto the fabric before dying is unique to African batik.

Batik has been used as an industry to alleviate poverty in rural areas alongside other textile making art forms. Due to the fact that small startup capital is required to establish the business, many women have set up businesses from their homes producing very brilliant and colorful designs for the local and international markets. We couldn't be more proud to be a part of this process.

This stunning collection of hand batik and tie-dyed fabrics are from the artisans of the Somanya village in Ghana, Africa. the motifs seen in these Travel backpacks and bags are modern block printed interpretations from ancient Akan symbols. Akan iconography originated under the Ashanti tribe.